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The best text expander for OS X

Written on 02 Jul 2013 by Kester Dobson

After a short stint in Windows, made easier by AutoHotKey text expansion, I am firmly back in the land of Mac.  I naturally jumped in to TextExpander but at $34.95 it was a struggle to justify it long term for lightweight text-expansion-only use.

So I hit the App Store. 

After a brief stint with "Smart Typer" (subsequently refunded by Apple due to it being grossly incapable and buggy, I found aText.

aText accelerates your typing by replacing abbreviations with frequently used phrases you define.

It works perfectly, all for the modestly affordable price tag of $5.  You can save yourself a lot of trial and error if you're looking for straightforward OS X text expansion and go straight to aText.

Redis, Heroku and the Business Benefit of Free Tiers

Written on 05 Apr 2013 by Kester Dobson

There are currently 5 different Redis add-ons available on the Heroku platform.

Redis To Go, Redis Cloud, openredis, MyRedis and RedisGreen

Which do you choose?  I imagine there's a fairly long tail of Heroku apps that use one of the free Redis tiers offered by the providers that have one, but there must also be (me included) a pool of developers who want to develop and test on a single Heroku instance using a free tier, and then ramp everything up to a billable level once they go live.

For me the decision was based on who gives you the most for free.  

Whilst I have no experience in running a hosted Redis service and what impact free tiers have on profitability, it seems unlikely that when faced with 5 options a developer is going to go for one they can't try for free.  That would rule out openredis and RedisGreen straight away (chepeast tier $10 and $169 per month, respectively).

With the remaining 3 options you will be left to compare and contrast simultaneous connections and database size.  MyRedis gives you 5Mb and 3 connections, which knock them out of the race.

So then you're left with RedisCloud and Redis To Go.  Both have the same number of simulatenous connections (10) which leaves RedisCloud as our winner because they give you a 20Mb instance over 10Mb.

Does this make logical sense?  Perhaps not, but I can't be the only one who has gone through this thought process.  It might make more sense to look at the higher tiers which will match your intended capacity, but there's a great opportunity to get customers in by offering a good quality free tier.

When I went live and ramped up, did I research the next tier up?  Nope, just hit upgrade on my RedisCloud free tier.

 

HTML Form Multiple Submit Buttons, Different Actions

Written on 28 Mar 2013 by Kester Dobson

I've often wondered as to the best way of having two form buttons that can submit but yield slightly different actions.  Turns out HTML5 scratches that itch with the `formaction` attribute.

The formaction attribute specifies the URL of a file that will process the input control when the form is submitted.

In my case, it's going to the same (Sinatra) controller action route, but by appending a simple URL parameter (`?action=this`) you can modify the response/control to change behaviour accordingly.

Simples

Check it out on W3Schools

Windows 8 still can't set your timezone for you

Written on 27 Mar 2013 by Kester Dobson

After setting up a handful of Windows 8 laptops it dawned on me that the much debated operating system still refuses to set your timezone based on your region selection.

You'd think by now that when you tell Windows you are in the UK and would like a UK keyboard layout, it might be able to then set the timezone to London/GMT/BST.  Nope.  Still defaults to the US West Coast.

The [Ramaze] flash isn't just for messages

Written on 24 Aug 2012 by Kester Dobson

Interesing piece on The Pug Automatic about creative uses for the Rails `flash` function.  Although the implementations differ, the Ramaze version of `flash` will enable you to do much the same things.

I particularly like the idea of passing down "one off" event data to a JavaScript embed, so you can potentially fire of Google Analytics (or other) tracking messages on a one-off basis, without having to embed excessive controller style logic in your views.

A good reminder in the comments, as well, about not caching any views where you are likely to be using this, as people will either end up with other people's flashes, or stuck with the same flash for X minutes/hours.

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